Monthly Archives: December 2012

Chevron Stripes

Stripes have a reputation.  Horizontal stripes in particular have long been blamed for having a widening effect.  Which is why, I hypothesize, that they have been relegated to socks with such popularity. These days though, there are a lot of great stripe variations that are really nice and wearable.

However, there is one particular fool-proof solution: the chevron stripe!  Just like the road sign, this means stripes in a V-shaped pattern.   There are some variations to the chevron stripe.  One that is fairly popular for home decor right now is the zig zag stripe but I am not a big fan of this one for fashion items:

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Rather, I recommend going with the ones that are a single “ ” down the middle, either with two colours, a selection of colours or a gradation of the same colour; the stripes can be the same thickness or vary in that as well:

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Today, many fabrics and knits are made with chevron striping already.  However, a chevron can easily be acheived by sewing striped materiel together on the diagonal which is how the many of vintage pieces were made. This requires some degree of care as you must match up the stripes, which necessitates the kind of dedication that  many manufacturers no longer bother with.

You can find chevron pieces from many decades however, it is really a style that is associated with the 1970s.  It must have been a pretty major fashion trend back then because you can find so many pieces from this decade, including most of the examples that I feature here.   Perhaps because of this, the 70s is the decade that does the the chevron best and provides the most beautiful examples.

The direction of the chevron can be either right side up () which most pieces are, or it can be upside down ().  Here are a few examples available on Etsy that demonstrate how these two versions can look:

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Upside down (⋁)

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While we are on the subject of direction, my absolute favourite chevron pieces are the dresses that have both directions.  So, the top is an upside down and the bottom is a right side up , and a diamond is created at the waist.  You can find these from time to time in 70s dresses but they are not that common… so if you find one that fits, grab it!  Here are a couple of classic example:

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The reverse is even rarer and can be pretty amazing, this dress on Etsy being an incredible example!

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You can also find some dresses where the skirt is a chevron but the bodice is horizontal or vertical.  In some ways I suppose this can widen the chest and slim down the hips if that is the sort of effect that you are looking for.

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From all of these examples, you can really see that the chevron was a staple in skirts during the 70s.  But I also really love it for shirts and the top part of dresses.  It can be a really flattering look!

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The chevron did prevail for a while during the 80s for tops as well and you do start to see some examples from then, especially in the bat-wing armed sweaters that spanned the late 70s into the 80s.

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To get this look, have a look at some great pieces that I have grouped into some Etsy treasuries: skirtstopsdresses and even more dresses.

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Filed under Fashion History, How to wear vintage, Vintage trends

The Detachable Peplum Revealed!

Before I move on from peplums for quite a while, here is just one last post.  While I am on the subject of peplums, and on the subject of detachable fashion items, I figure I can’t move on until I talk about the detachable peplum!  Unlike detachable collars, these are not trending right now.  However, In my opinion they should be.  I found one in a vintage shop a few years ago and I am converted.

Historically, like the detachable collar, a detacheable peplum was included in some patterns so that you could make to spice up your secretary skirt or day dress.   Similar to the detachable collar, these added versatility to one’s wardrobe and stemmed from the economy in the 30s to 50s, lending variety with less fabric. Similar to other accessories, you could match your detachable peplum to the colour of your dress to make it appear attached, or you could contrast it with another colour or texture1.  Various fabrics were used including fancier materiel such as lace, organza, velvet or taffeta which would dress up one’s outfit as well1.

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Today of course I would recommend a funkier way to wear one of these than shown in these old patterns, particularly that apron-like one.  Especially never wear one like a cape! That kind of modesty is not likely to make a come back any time soon.

Though I’m advocating giving the detachable peplum a new life in this post I actually found one amazing set from the 60s in the style of the patterns above on Etsy, and there is always a place for beautiful classics in your wardrobe such as this one!

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You can still match or miss-match them to your outfit, but I like a more casual use for the detachable peplum and I particularly love it paired with jeans.  If you match it to what you are wearing, then you will have an instant peplum top or dress and can mimic that look really well.  If you don’t then it will look more like an accessory, and will be really original.   Here are a few ideas of how to go about the latter.

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Vintage detachable peplums are really hard to find. I have found a few on Etsy listed below all of which are from the 80s, many of which are made to go with a matching dress, which I hadn’t realized was “a thing” during this decade too.  These would be fun pieces to get because you could wear them together, or take the peplum only and wear it mismatched as in the pics above. If you are interested in keeping an eye out for them, search for “peplum belt” as well.

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Luckily, I am not the only one who thinks detachable peplums are the cat’s meow and there are several hand-made pieces on Etsy.  These are some of my favourites:

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You could really get a fun little DIY project going to make one of these.  When I have a little more time, I’ll blog  one, so stay tuned!

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References:

1. Sewing Made Easy; New Revised Edition.  By Marie Lynch & Dorothy Sara. Garden City Books, ~1955. USA.

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How to Wear a Vintage Peplum

Many designers are doing peplums today, and now it’s not hard to find a peplum top or dress in a fast fashion shop.  However, it is always more fun to wear an original!  Have a look at my last post, The Peplum Through History to see how they have developed in modern times. After this journey back through time, you are probably now wondering how in the world you can pull off a vintage peplum piece for this trend? But, it’s easy!

First, a few notes about cut.  Indeed you will probably want to try a few types of peplums to figure out what looks best on your shape.  For example, a short (~1 foot) very ruffled peplum would look better on narrower hips1, while a flatter uneven or gathered peplum may highlight curvier ladies. What is fun about the peplum is that, if you have hips and a waist it accentuates them, and if you don’t, it gives you them!  Some people say that not everyone can pull off a peplum, but to them I say pshaw. A little trial and error may simply be required to find the perfect one for you.  Or, to heck with that in general and wear whatever you like!

In choosing pieces from the 30s and 40s, avoid those with the longer peplums, these are pretty frumpy. This piece from the Metropolitan Museum of Art collection, beautiful as it is, is a perfect case in point:

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Uneven or gathered peplums are especially lovely. Below are few examples of highly wearable and beautiful pieces from the 30s and 40s that you can get on Etsy, and I have a few more posted in my treasury, Wearable Peplums From the 30s and 40s.

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Though I mentioned in my last post that the peplum largely disappeared between the 40a and 80s, it did pop up now and again.  If you dig the prairie style dresses from the 60s, which are really poplular these days, my absolute favorite versions are the ones with peplums!  Here are a couple lovely examples on Etsy:

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One must tread carefully if one plans to wear an 80s peplum since some of them are just too far out.  But that said, there are many awesome examples, mainly in party dresses.  Here are a few from Etsy that I really love and check my treasure Wearable Peplums of the 80s for more.

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Simple peplum jackets are amazingly beautiful too, particularly those made of wool or pared with a matching skirt.  The more subtle versions have in fact been around rather constantly throughout time.  Buying one of these is a great investment because it is classic, and you would likely wear it for the rest of your life. These are good examples of what I am talking about.  They aren’t easy to find, so if you do see one, and it fits, go for it!

Photos from blog pics

There is another quick way to get the instant peplum look… with a detachable peplum!  Have a look at my next post to see how.

 

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References:

1. Sewing Made Easy; New Revised Edition.  By Marie Lynch & Dorothy Sara. Garden City Books, ~1955. USA.

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Filed under How to wear vintage